Filtering by: Photography

Jul
6
to Aug 19

Introducing Blake Chorley

Reception: join us for our 6th Annual “So You Didn’t Get Out of Town for Stampede” Cocktail Hour Friday July 14, 5-7 pm Artist Talk at 6:oo pm

As a genre, landscape art rose to prominence in the seventeenth-century thanks to French painters Claude Lorraine and Nicholas Poussin. Though initially relegated to the backgrounds of more important subjects, the awe-inspiring power of nature struck a chord with artists which continues to endure today. Nowadays, landscape art is so ubiquitous it is sometimes considered a trope (just think of the 59+ million #landscape tags on Instagram), so it is a rare work indeed, which sets itself apart from the crowd.

A quick glance of Blake Chorley’s black and white images could easily be misinterpreted as vintage photographs of the Canadian landscape, but closer inspection reveals much more at play. Though “printed” using a wet plate technique from the 1850s, Chorley’s ambrotypes are the result of his own invention—a mash-up of digital and analog layering techniques—which offers a fresh take on the medium and breathes new life into the landscape. The resulting images are hauntingly beautiful portraits of the land which appear almost three-dimensional due to the physical separation between the foreground and background.

Blake Chorley is an emerging artist based in Calgary. He holds a BA from the University of Windsor and an MFA from the University of Calgary, and was recently awarded First Place in the Exposure Photography Festival’s Emerging Photographer Showcase (2017). His unique photographs are the product of countless hours of study and field research spent developing an experimental process which combines digital, film, and plate photographic techniques.

"I wanted to look at photography not as three different processes, plate, film, and digital, but rather I wanted to find a way to make the evolution of photography work together as one complete process."                        

– Blake Chorley

Above the Notch.JPG
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Feb
4
to Mar 18

Sarah Fuller : Camouflage (Hulinhjálmsteinn)

Sat, 4 Feb 2017 — Sat, 18 Mar 2017

 

Sarah’s current work explores layers of history and narrative through the use of the photographic object. An underlying feature in her work is displacement – be it physical, psychological or constructed. In Camouflage (Hulinhjálmsteinn), she is exploring mimicry and camouflage as a way to assimilate into a foreign landscape. This work represents a conceptual exploration of what it means to be from one place but have ties to another.

Opening reception February 18, 1-4pm. Artist talk at 2pm.

 

 

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Feb
4
to Mar 18

7 CAMERAS

Sat, 4 Feb 2017 — Sat, 18 Mar 2017

Join us for our 4th group exhibition featuring new and recent photography by Kevin Boyle, Gary Campbell, Ben Cope, Michael Levin, Colin Smith, Leesa Streifler, and Diana Thorneycroft. These artists employ a mix of traditional and contemporary approaches to highlight the subjects that inspire them, using methods that range from camera obscura to digital photography.

Featuring artwork by Kevin Boyle, Gary Campbell, Ben Cope, Michael Levin, Colin Smith, Leesa Streifler, Diana Thorneycroft, Mike Binzer, Karrie Arthurs, Verna Vogel, and Sarah Fuller

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Oct
20
to Nov 26

Karrie Arthurs : Revenant Portraits

Thu, 20 Oct 2016 — Sat, 26 Nov 2016

Revenant Portraits is a series that examines the personal stories of 19th century North American settlers and prairie dwellers. Original 19th century charcoal portraits have been altered and drawn upon with ink and charcoal to create narratives for these lives that existed at one point in the past, and the ghosts that now exist in their place. The fragility of the paper that survived the years reflects the fading stories that diminish over time. 

Karrie Arthurs received her B.F.A. with distinction from the Alberta College of Art and Design in 2000. She had her first solo show entitled “Paper Weight” at the Christine Klassen Gallery in 2012. She continues to exhibit locally and internationally participating in solo, and group shows. Her work is found in numerous private collections such as that of Paul Hardy Design, in Calgary, Alberta. Karrie currently resides in Airdrie, Alberta, Canada with her two children. She is a practicing tattooer since 2001, and owns her own shop here in Calgary, Alberta.

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Feb
4
to Mar 19

Kevin Boyle : DaySleeper

Thu, 4 Feb 2016 — Sat, 19 Mar 2016

Reception : Saturday February 6, 1-4 pm | Artist Talk at 2 pm

Kevin Boyle is Vancouver-based photographer who was born and raised in the Canadian Prairies. He spends his time roaming the vastness of the plains of his homeland, documenting the dilapidated ruins of what were once thriving communities. His subjects—abandoned businesses and gathering places—are carefully captured under the cover of night and given a second chance to shine. The resulting large format photographs earnestly pay homage to a time that technology and the busyness of life have let pass by.

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Feb
4
to Mar 19

Leesa Streifler : Drawing the Photograph

Thu, 4 Feb 2016 — Sat, 19 Mar 2016

Reception : Saturday February 6, 1-4 pm | Artist Talk at 2 pm

Leesa Streifler is a multidisciplinary artist and art professor whose career spans over three decades. Born in Winnipeg and based in Regina, her work has been exhibited widely across Canada and as far as Bulgaria and is included in prominent collections like the National Gallery of Canada. She is well known and respected for her feminist work investigating the female body, which takes shape through painting, drawing, photography and text. This mini survey of her photo-based work corresponds with the Exposure Photography Festival and marks Streifler’s first major exhibition in a commercial gallery.

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Sep
8
to Oct 17

Colin Smith : 76 Boler

Tue, 8 Sep 2015 — Sat, 17 Oct 2015

ArtWalk Reception: Saturday September 19, 1-4 pm | Artist Talk & Camera Obscura Demo at 2 pm

CKG is excited to launch our fall programming with an exhibition by Colin Smith that pays homage to the timeless summer tradition of road tripping.

Some of my earliest memories as a child were the long summer vacation road trips. Heading across the Rocky Mountains in Grandma’s white, overheating, 64 Mustang, or my family’s annual pilgrimage across Western Canada. [These] early family vacations began an insatiable appetite for the open road.

Smith’s latest series of large format photographs takes us on an epic journey from Banff to Utah, presenting landscape in a way most of us haven’t seen since we were kids laying in the back seat of the family car. Familiar sights are seen anew—mountains, deserts and rivers all flipped and trapped in the confines of Smith’s trusty 76 Boler trailer.

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Jan
29
to Mar 7

Diana Thorneycroft

Thu, 29 Jan 2015 — Sat, 7 Mar 2015

We are thrilled to welcome Winnipeg artist Diana Thorneycroft to CKG with this exhibition of work from her well-loved series Group of Seven Awkward Moments as well as new favourites from Canadians and Americans (best friends forever… it’s complicated). Both of these series explore the complexities of Canadian identity by appropriating popular toys and icons into elaborately constructed dioramas she then photographs.

Known for her wry sense of humour, bold work and unique approach to photography, Diana’s work has been widely exhibited across Canada as well as internationally, and she has been the subject of numerous articles and publications.

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Jan
29
to Feb 7

5 CAMERAS reprise

Gary Campbell, Ben Cope, Sarah Fuller, Michael Levin and Colin Smith

Thu, 29 Jan 2015 — Sat, 7 Mar 2015

Christine Klassen Gallery is pleased to present a selection of photography that celebrates the diversity of the medium and our gallery artists in conjunction with the Exposure Photography Festival.

This second edition group exhibition features new and recent work by Gary Campbell, Ben Cope, Sarah Fuller, Michael Levin and Colin Smith. From the camera obscura to digital photography, these artists use a mix of traditional and contemporary approaches to highlight the subjects that inspire them.
 

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Feb
6
to Mar 1

DECADE : Celebrating Exposure's First 10 Years

Thu, 6 Feb 2014 — Sat, 1 Mar 2014

Vincent J. Varga, Guest Curator, 2014

Photography, video, and other lens-based imagery are now part of our cultural DNA. Perhaps this growing interest in the photo- graphic image should come as no surprise given the flood of imagery we deal with on a daily, minute-by-minute basis. Yet, our mind’s eye is perpetually scanning and looking for something of interest that rises above the common and everyday flood of brand pop culture imagery. Not only are these commercial images everywhere enticing us, we too are encouraged to add to the tsunami of visual culture with our cameras and smart phones. While being ubiquitous and engrained in our society, photography has the capacity to help us see the world in new ways.

Since the invention of photography practitioners have questioned, explored and examined numerous characteristics of the lens-based image that inform what has become known as the art of photography. For example, the intentionality of the photographer is made evident through ‘framing ‘ or the process of signifying what is of importance or significance through the composition, subject matter, and thematic content. Time-based imagery – whether it be 1/60th of a second or hours, days, or years – speaks not only to duration, but allegorically alludes to experience and further layering of evident and implied meaning. The choice of black and white or colour imagery confers and implies emotional and psychological immediacy and tone to the visual statement being made. Whether ‘found,’ created as a constructed montage, staged as a tableau, or Photoshopped into being, the image illustrates the enormous breadth and potential for the imagination.

In February 2005, Exposure, a festival dedicated to celebrating photography, was first presented in Banff, and Calgary. From its inception, Exposure has sought to include work from the international community of photographers and be responsive to the broad cross-section of approaches and traditions. Since that first iteration of this festival of lens based art, the Bow corridor has witnessed ten successive years of the excellent photo- graphy, increasing public attention and support for the Festival. Over the past decade more than 325 photographers have presented their work or conducted work- shops during this early winter festival. This number does not take into account the annual exhibitions organized by the Whyte Museum’s Through the Lens and the various educational institution group shows at, for example, the Alberta College of Art + Design and the University of Calgary.

Decade presents work drawn from the previous festivals and demonstrates the diversity of photographic methods practiced here. It pays tribute to the genesis of Exposure – to all who organized, curated, installed, and raised funds toward its success – and offers an overview of our community’s collective fascination with lens-based imagery. In so doing, it also recognizes the persistent vision of those photographers who painstakingly explore to make sense of and meaning in the world.

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Feb
6
to Mar 1

SARAH FULLER : The Forest of No Return

Thu, 6 Feb 2014 — Sat, 1 Mar 2014

The Forest of No Return/The Homecoming

As part of the 2013 Natural and Manufactured exhibition at the ODD Gallery in Dawson City, Ipresented a site-specific installation piece called The Homecoming in Bear Creek, Yukon Territory.

The historical town of Bear Creek is situated approximately 12 km outside of Dawson City and was the former company town for Yukon Consolidated Gold Corporation (YCGC). It has been abandoned since the mid-1960s and is now maintained by Parks Canada as a National Historic Site. Many of the YCGC residential buildings have been transported from their original site in Bear Creek, and other sites, to Dawson City. All that remains of their presence in the original sites are their foundations.

In the outdoor installation The Homecoming, I integrated five YCGC buildings into sites related to their former place of residence via large-scale photographic prints on linen. These prints were manipulated using theatre techniques once used by Daguerre in the Paris Diorama in the mid 1850s, and saw the houses shift from dusk to night. This created a sense of home in the structures, as well as a visual play on memory, ghosts and history. In tandem to the installation at Bear Creek, five signs were placed around Dawson City in front of the buildings where they currently stand today. Each sign contained a short history of the residence and its connection to YCGC and Bear Creek.

In August 2013, when the pieces were installed in their locations, I documented each piece with a large format camera and video. Once removed from the site, I reflected on how the large linen pieces would live on in a subsequent exhibition, and decided against presenting the pieces anywhere else except Bear Creek. What remains in The Forest of No Return is the facsimile of the recreated town through photography and video; a photograph within another photograph; theatre projected onto the landscape. I also photographed the remnants of the town during the day, a stark contrast to the effect created by the linen pieces at night. The exhibition reflects the relationship between the fabricated memory of the town found in the linen pieces, and the real state of the buildings and town remnants as they exist in the forest that has grown up around them.

When gathering information about the town, I interviewed two sisters from the Troberg family, who grew up in Bear Creek until the family was required to move when the town was shut down. They spoke of an idyllic place – family-oriented, safe, and surrounded by the natural world. Their house was located down a different road then most of the others and a small forest behind the house led down to a creek . The sisters told me of how they used to play in the forest, and called it “The Forest of No Return”, inspired by the song of the same name from the 1961 Disney film “Babes in Toyland”. This title struck me as the perfect metaphor for time-passing and the way memory hangs in our minds, from childhood or otherwise. It also relates to the spooky atmosphere created in the original installation and ghost stories that hover around Bear Creek and Dawson City.

YCGC announced it was shutting down the end of season 1966 and all families were to leave by the following spring.  The subsequent years saw the transport of several residential buildings to Dawson and the former town site turn to disrepair. The titleThe Forest of No Return refers to the physical evidence of atrophy in the townsite, but also the reality of time and inability to return to a past remembered existence.

In my art practice, I am interested in the relationship between theatre, photography and perception. Much of my work has been concerned with a sense of place and different experiences of the concept of 'home'.

I would like to acknowledge the important support of the Canada Council for the Arts and the Alberta Foundation for the Arts in the production of this project. I would also like to acknowledge the important support of the Visual Arts Department at The Banff Centre, the ODD gallery, and the Klondike Institute for Arts in Culture in creation of this work.

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